Skip to content

Ashtanga + Moon Days

November 9, 2009

A smattering of explanations around the web on Ashtanga and Moon Days.
2010 Moondays are listed below.

@Ashtanga Power
Phases of the moon are determined by the moon’s relative position to the sun.

Full moons occur when the moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun. During a full moon, the moon is fully illuminated by the sun and is seen as a round disc from the Earth’s surface.

New moons occur when the moon is between the Earth and the Sun. During a new moon, the moon is seen as a thin crescent from the Earth’s surface.

In Ashtanga tradition, new moon days and full moon days should be days of rest for Ashtanga yoga practitioners. By observing moon days, we recognize and honor the rhythms of nature.

The human body, similar to our planet, is affected by the gravitational pull of both the moon and the sun. The positions of the sun and moon creates an energetic experience that can be compared to the breath cycle.

The full moon corresponds to the end of an inhalation where we feel energetic and emotional, but not well grounded.

The new moon corresponds to the end of an exhalation where we feel calm and grounded, but not energetic or inclined to physical exertion.

@Ashtanga Yoga Center
Traditionally, Saturday is the day of rest. On this day Pattabhi Jois recommends his students take an oil bath to reduce excess internal heat which can be felt as pain and stiffness in the body, a short temper, red skin, redness in the eyes, or pinkish acne.  For detailed information regarding traditional oil baths visit Kimberly and Noah Williams atwww.ashtangayogashala.com/articals-oil.html.

@Ashtanga Yoga Center
Both full and new moon days are observed as yoga holidays in the Ashtanga Yoga tradition. What is the reasoning behind this?

Like all things of a watery nature (human beings are about 70% water), we are affected by the phases of the moon. The phases of the moon are determined by the moon’s relative position to the sun. Full moons occur when they are in opposition and new moons when they are in conjunction. Both sun and moon exert a gravitational pull on the earth. Their relative positions create different energetic experiences that can be compared to the breath cycle. The full moon energy corresponds to the end of inhalation when the force of prana is greatest. This is an expansive, upward moving force that makes us feel energetic and emotional, but not well grounded. The Upanishads state that the main prana lives in the head. During the full moon we tend to be more headstrong.

The new moon energy corresponds to the end of exhalation when the force of apana is greatest. Apana is a contracting, downward moving force that makes us feel calm and grounded, but dense and disinclined towards physical exertion.

The Farmers Almanac recommends planting seeds at the new moon when the rooting force is strongest and transplanting at the full moon when the flowering force is strongest.

Practicing Ashtanga Yoga over time makes us more attuned to natural cycles. Observing moon days is one way to recognize and honor the rhythms of nature so we can live in greater harmony with it.

@Ashtanga Yoga Shala
That day is very difficult day. Two stars one place (conjunction) is going. New moon also, full moon also. That day very dangerous day. You (take) practice (on that day), anyone can have a small pain starting. That pain is not going very quickly. Long time he is taking. Some broken possible. That is why that day don’t do.

@Greenroom Yoga
Lunar cycles affect our subtle energy systems. The new and full moons are the strongest points of the lunar cycle. It is said that because our energy is more strongly affected on these days, there is a greater risk of injury during practice. It is also said that injuries suffered on moon days take longer to heal. On the New moon, the body is more grounded, but we usually feel heavy and inflexible. On the Full moon, the body is full of ungrounded energy which creates physical instability. For these reasons, Ashtanga yoga is not practiced during the New or Full Moon. Rest, honor the moon and enjoy the day off!

@Infinite Yoga
The Moon exhibits a strong gravitational pull on the earth which is most easily observed in the high tides that accompany the full and new moons. As our bodies consist of more than 80% water it is no surprise that we to are equally affected by such forces – although few of us are consciously aware. Generally more energy is available on Full Moon days, less on New Moon days and it is easy for students to harm themselves. It is said that an injury on a moon day takes twice as long to heal.

@YogaWorkshop
In the formal Ashtanga Vinyasa tradition no asana (posture) practice is done on new and full moon days. Observing this restraint to practice can be helpful in not becoming too attached to practice and routine. It also provides time for the body to rest and recuperate.

Moondays 2010

January 15th Friday New Moon
January 30th Saturday Full Moon
February 14th Sunday New Moon
February 28th Sunday Full Moon
March 15th Monday New Moon
March 30th Tuesday Full Moon
April 14th Wednesday New Moon
April 28th Wednesday Full Moon
May 14th Friday New Moon
May 27th Thursday Full Moon
June 12th Saturday New Moon
June 26th Saturday Full Moon
July 11th Sunday New Moon
July 26th Monday Full Moon
August 10th Tuesday New Moon
August 24th Tuesday Full Moon
September 8th Wednesday New Moon
September 23rd Thursday Full Moon
October 7th Thursday New Moon
October 23rd Saturday Full Moon
November 6th Saturday New Moon
November 21st Sunday Full Moon
December 5th Sunday New Moon
December 21st Tuesday Full Moon
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: